10 Signs Your Kidneys Are In Trouble

Hello, Health, Champions., The kidney is a remarkable organ.. If it were to fail, you would be really sick within a couple of days and you would probably be dead within a week. So today I want to talk about some of the most important signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.

But, more importantly, I want to help you understand how to recognize it in the very early stages. So you never have to walk down that path of kidney failure, dialysis and kidney transplant. Coming right, up.

, Hey! I'm Dr. Ekberg.! I'm, a holistic doctor and a former Olympic decathlete, and if you want to truly master health by understanding how the body really works, make sure you subscribe hit that bell and turn on all the notifications.

So you never miss a life-saving video.. I was shocked when I did some research. I watched some other videos on this topic that had tens of millions of views that did nothing more than list some signs and symptoms scare you to death and tell you to go, see a doctor.

. Now, of course, there's a time and a place to go, see a doctor, but if we understand a little bit about the kidney and appreciate how amazing it is and how to take care of it, then we may never have to go see A doctor.

, The kidney is often described as a filter, and while that is correct, it does so much more.. It is a sensor., It senses various different metabolites in the body and then it produces hormones in response to that.

So it helps regulate various things in the body. One of the things it's sensitive to and regulates, is pH. It can get rid of acid. It can get rid of base to regulate the pH of the blood. It is very sensitive to oxygen, which we'll talk about more in a little bit, but most of what the kidney does is reabsorption all right.

The kidney filters, the blood, so it pushes fluid out through a very, very fine filter, but then it reabsorbs most of it. So it filters out over 200 liters of fluid every day, but because it wants to keep certain things while getting rid of others.

It is a selective filter., It reabsorbs, 99 % of all the water and all the sodium. So it's very good at getting rid of the extra sodium that it doesn't want.. When it comes to potassium it. Reabsorbs 88 % of it when it comes to glucose and amino acids, which are precious fuel and building blocks it doesn't want to lose any of those, so it reabsorbs 100 percent.

Unless you're a diabetic or your blood, sugar is so high that you exceed the reabsorption threshold. Then you're, going to be spilling glucose in the urine, but again that's, not a normal state.. Then there are some things that the body wants to get rid of like creatinine and it's, so good at this that it eliminates 100 % it reabsorbs nothing of the things that it doesn't want.

So it's, incredibly clever and very, very selective.. Now here's where creatinine comes in handy., We know that the kidney is supposed to filter out 100 % of it. So there's, only supposed to be a tiny amount left and based on that, we can estimate the glomerular filtration rate, that's, a number that tells us how well the kidneys are working.

. If the kidneys start getting clogged up, then that number changes it goes down.. The creatinine is based on muscle activity. If you have more muscle activity or more muscle mass, it can skew the numbers a little bit.

If you have muscle breakdown like from an injury or from a hard workout that can change the number and they estimate this number based on age, race and gender, because people are a little bit different.

But the whole point of this is that the eGFR is a pretty good way to measure how your kidneys are working and how to give you little hints long long before you have symptoms.. There are five stages to chronic kidney disease and all the other places that I looked.

They listed signs and symptoms as if they happened randomly or equally through the different stages of degeneration, but understanding when they happen makes all the difference in knowing what to look for.

In stage one of kidney disease. The number is normal. The glomerular filtration rate is all still working, but the kidney may still have taken some damage.. There may still be some infection, some bacteria, something that's, breaking it down that we find something abnormal going on, maybe in the blood, maybe in the urine.

But then, in stage two now we have a reduced filtration rate, so it's down to 60 to 89 milliliters per minute. Stage. 3 is 35 to 59. Stage. 4 is 15 to 29. Now it's, really really starting to shut down and when it reaches less than 15 milliliters per minute.

Now we have stage 5 and we have pretty much a complete shutdown of the kidneys, and we certainly want to avoid this. We want to find out, we want to understand what to do in the early stages and recognize that.

. Now this is a complex topic and I'm only covering one variable, which is the eGFR estimated glomerular filtration rate, but in real life you never just look at one marker. You're, going to look at the bigger picture.

You're, going to look at the other things that the liver and the kidney are doing. But I'm using this just to illustrate what can happen. In stage one. You're, probably not going to have any or very few symptoms.

What you might see is some changes in urination. If you have an infection, it might burn upon urination. You might see a change in color or smell, and if that happens, and you haven't eaten a bunch of asparagus, then that might be a sign that your kidney is having some trouble.

. If there's, a change in frequency, if there's, a change in appearance, if there's, some discoloration or cloudiness or foam that's, not a good thing.. If there's protein in the urine or bacteria that could give rise to a change in in any of these above.

In stage two of chronic kidney disease, now we're, seeing a reduction in filtration rate, the filter'S getting a little clogged up, we might see about a 30 percent reduction in filtration rate, but you're, probably going to have still none or very few symptoms, and a lot of people will come into my office with numbers in this range and They have absolutely no idea, no symptoms.

, Now here's. The interesting thing that I don't understand is: this is called normal on the blood work and, even though it's called stage 2 chronic kidney disease. This range is considered normal.. If you look down here, the reference range, is you're good as long as you're over 59, but I would pay very close attention to this because it means something.

And if someone comes in with an 80, I'm, going to look extra carefully at what to do with that kidney. When we get to stage 3 of chronic kidney disease. Now is where the real problems happen. The filtration rate is down to about half 30 to 59 milliliters per minute, and we're starting to get a lot more symptoms.

, Not everybody gets them, but they're becoming more frequent and there's. Quite a few. You could get high blood pressure because the kidney senses blood pressure, and so, if it's, not working so well, then it can't regulate blood pressure as well, but also it can work the other way that the high blood pressure Puts a lot of damage pushed a lot of stress on the kidney.

The friction actually hurts the kidney, so the kidney can cause and be the result of high blood pressure.. Now anemia number three.. How does that happen? Well, the kidney senses. How much oxygen is in your blood and if there's, not enough, it's, going to produce a hormone called EPO or erythropoietin.

That means making red stuff basically and what it's making is red blood cells. So if you go up into the mountains for a few weeks, your kidney senses there's less oxygen, let's, make more red blood cells.

But if there's, damage to the kidney, then it can't keep up with making enough of this EPO and you're, not making enough red blood cells, and you get anemic. Symptom number four that can happen in Stage three, as things get more serious, is bone.

Disease. Normal bone looks like this. Osteoporotic bone looks like that, and this is because there's. A mineral called phosphate and phosphate needs to be balanced with calcium.. The ratio is much more important than how much you actually have of each.

. So if the kidney gets damaged now it can't, keep up with eliminating with getting rid of so as it loses the ability to clear the phosphate. The phosphate builds up in the blood, and now we have to balance it with calcium.

. So the body makes a hormone that is going to pull calcium from the bone to balance that phosphate., So that's. How kidney disease can actually cause osteoporosis., But there's even more stuff going on in stage 3.

We can have edema and primarily in hands feet and in the face around the eyes, and this happens because, as the kidney starts getting really damaged and really leaky now the protein spills out of the kidney into the urine and one of those proteins is called albumin And it's, the number one blood protein and it acts like a sponge.

. It has an osmotic pull that keeps the water in the appropriate amount inside the blood vessel.. As we start dropping as we lose albumin, we also start losing water. It just leaks into the surrounding tissues, causing swelling called edema.

Back pain is also very common, and there's two ways this can show up if it's more diffused. If it's like all over and not in a non-general way in the back, then it's, usually a referred pain and any time an organ has a lot of distress.

We can get some referred pain around that organ now, if this pain is more sharp, if it feels like someone stabbed you in the back and won't, let go that's, probably a kidney stone, and one way that you can Distinguish this from other severe back pain? Is that a kidney stone typically is not gonna ease up? No matter what you put your body position, in.

It's like you. Just can't get out of that pain because the kidney stone is like a glass shard that's just sitting trying to make its way out through a tiny tube and it doesn't matter. How you move your body? It's, just still gonna hurt.

Stage, 4 of chronic kidney disease. Now it's, getting really really serious. The filtration is close to shutting down 15 to 29 milliliters per minute.. The symptoms are going to be the exact same ones as in stage three, but they're, going to happen more frequently to a greater percentage of people to a more severe degree.

, And so all the symptoms become more severe. The damage to the kidney goes from moderate to severe, and now we're in a very, very serious state.. We really want to catch it way way way before it ever gets to this, because it's rare that you can do anything about it at this point now you're, very near kidney failure and they typically they give you counseling To start preparing you for dialysis, or if you're fortunate to get a transplant.

, You really don't want to get to this point stage: 5 of chronic kidney disease. Now we're, pretty close to complete failure.. We're less than 15 milliliters per minute. If it hasn & # 39, t shut down completely it's really close.

, And now we're, going to start seeing some more extreme symptoms that you would never get in the earlier stages. And breathing is going to suffer. Why you're, almost drowning in your own lungs, because this fluid that's leaking out into the tissues from edema from a lack of albumin.

Now it can start filling up your lungs known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.. You also get things like sleeping trouble. You can't sleep through the night because your body gets so toxic. Your whole nervous system is basically on fire.

. You have ammonia breath.. Ammonia is something you normally get rid of through the urine, but nothing's getting out that way, so the body is desperately trying to rid of it any way it can, such as through the lungs.

, And you also can find a metallic taste as More toxins to start building up trying to leave the body and overall, your toxicity levels, just keep increasing, keep increasing and you're, going to see things like itching like nausea and vomiting.

. Like I said, the body should try and get rid of the toxins any way it can, and at this point obviously, you're, not going to have much appetite because the body doesn't want anything coming in. It'S just trying to get rid of stuff very commonly you see things like muscle cramps, because your minerals, your electrolytes, are a mess because your kidneys can't regulate any of that anymore.

. So at this point there's, not a whole lot. You can do it's really just a matter of time before there's, dialysis, kidney transplant or death.. Now I think you agree that's, a pretty unpleasant picture that's, pretty dark! None of us would ever want to get to that point.

. So here's, the big question: what does it look like before it ever gets to any of these stages? Would you agree that that is the time that you want to do something about it? So here is the early way that you can tell.

The earliest. It can tell it's called insulin resistance, and if you watch some videos on this channel, you probably recognize that. But why is it related to the kidney because type 2 diabetes is the number one cause of kidney failure? And how does it do that? Because diabetes destroys tiny, delicate blood vessels and the kidney has lots of them another place they're common is in the retina, so diabetes is also the number one cause of blindness and it can also destroy fine nerve, endings and tiny blood vessels.

In the periphery of the body, so it's. Also the number one cause of amputations and the list goes on and on. But if you really want to take care of your kidneys, then start learning about insulin, resistance and reverse that.

. If you enjoyed this video - and you'd, like to learn more - that one would be a great one to watch next.. Thank you. So much for watching. I & # 39. Ll, see you next time, hello, health champions! The kidney is a remarkable organ.

If it were to fail, you would be really sick within a couple of days and you will probably be dead within a week so today i want to talk about some of the most important signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.

But more importantly, i want to help you understand how to recognize it in the very early stages. So you never have to walk down that path of kidney failure, dialysis and kidney transplant coming right up, hey i'm.

Dr ekberg, i'm, a holistic doctor and a former olympic decathlete, and if you want to truly master health by understanding how the body really works, make sure you subscribe hit that bell and turn on all the notifications.

So you never miss a life-saving video. I was shocked when i did some research. I watched some other videos on this topic that had tens of millions of views that did nothing more than list some signs and symptoms scare you to death and tell you to go, see a doctor.

Now, of course, there's a time and a place to go, see a doctor, but if we understand a little bit about the kidney and appreciate how amazing it is and how to take care of it, then we may never have to go see A doctor, kidney is often described as a filter, and while that is correct, it does so much more.

It is a sensor, it senses various different metabolites in the body and then it produces hormones in response to that. So it helps regulate various things in the body. One of the things it's sensitive to and regulates, is ph.

It can get rid of acid. It can get rid of base to regulate the ph of the blood. It is very sensitive to oxygen, which we'll talk about more. In a little bit, but most of what the kidney does is reabsorption all right, the kidney filters, the blood, so it pushes fluid out through a very, very fine filter, but then it reabsorbs most of it.

So it filters out over 200 liters of fluid every day, but because it wants to keep certain things while getting rid of others, it is a selective filter, it reabsorbs 99 of all the water and all the sodium.

So it's very good at getting rid of the extra sodium that it doesn't want when it comes to potassium it reabsorbs 88 of it when it comes to glucose and amino acids, which are precious fuel and building blocks.

It doesn't want to lose any of those, so it reabsorbs 100 percent. Unless you're a diabetic or your blood sugar is so high that you exceed the reabsorption threshold. Then you're, going to be spilling glucose in the urine, but again that's, not a normal state.

Then there are some things that the body wants to get rid of like creatinine and it's. So good at this that it eliminates 100, it reabsorbs nothing of the things that it doesn't want, so it's. Incredibly clever and very, very selective.

Now here's where creatinine comes in handy. We know that the kidney is supposed to filter out 100 of it, so there's only supposed to be a tiny amount left and based on that, we can estimate the glomerular filtration rate, that's, a number that tells us how Well, the kidneys are working.

If the kidneys start getting clogged up, then that number changes it goes down. The creatinine is based on muscle activity. If you have more muscle activity or more muscle mass, it can skew the numbers a little bit if you have muscle breakdown like from an injury or from a hard workout that can change the number and they estimate this number based on age, race and gender, because People are a little bit different, but the whole point of this is that the egfr is a pretty good way to measure how your kidneys are working and how to give you little hints long long before you have symptoms.

There are five stages to chronic kidney disease and all the other places that i looked. They listed signs and symptoms as if they happened randomly or equally through the different stages of degeneration, but understanding when they happen makes all the difference in knowing what to look for.

In stage one of kidney disease, the number is normal, the glomerular filtration rate is all still working, but the kidney may still have taken some damage. There may still be some infection, some bacteria, something that's, breaking it down that we find something abnormal going on, maybe in the blood, maybe in the urine, but then in stage two now we have a reduced filtration rate, so it'S down to 60 to 89 milliliters per minute stage: 3 is 35 to 59 stage.

4 is 15 to 29. Now it's, really really starting to shut down and when it reaches less than 15 milliliters per minute. Now we have stage five and we have pretty much a complete shutdown of the kidneys, and we certainly want to avoid this.

We want to find out. We want to understand what to do in the early stages and recognize that now this is a complex topic and i'm only covering one variable, which is the egfr estimated glomerular filtration rate, but in real life.

You never just look at one marker. You're, going to look at the bigger picture. You're, going to look at the other things that the liver and the kidney are doing, but i'm using this just to illustrate what can happen in stage one.

You're, probably not going to have any or very few symptoms. What you might see is some changes in urination. If you have an infection, it might burn upon urination. You might see a change in color or smell, and if that happens, and you haven't eaten a bunch of asparagus, then that might be a sign that your kidney is having some trouble.

If there's, a change in frequency, if there's, a change in appearance, if there's, some discoloration or cloudiness or foam that's, not a good thing. If there's protein in the urine or bacteria that could give rise to a change in in any of these above in stage two of chronic kidney disease.

Now we're, seeing a reduction in filtration rate, the filter's. Getting a little clogged up. We might see about a 30 percent reduction in filtration rate, but you're, probably going to have still none or very few symptoms, and a lot of people will come into my office with numbers in this range and they have absolutely no idea.

No symptoms now here's. The interesting thing that i don't understand is: this is called normal on the blood work and, even though it's called stage 2 chronic kidney disease, this range is considered normal.

If you look down here, the reference range, is you're good as long as you're over 59, but i would pay very close attention to this because it means something. And if someone comes in with an 80, i'm, going to look extra carefully at what to do with that kidney when we get to stage 3 of chronic kidney disease now is where the real problems happen.

The filtration rate is down to about half 30 to 59 milliliters per minute, and we're starting to get a lot more symptoms. Not everybody gets them, but they're becoming more frequent and there's. Quite a few.

You could get high blood pressure because the kidney senses blood pressure, and so, if it's, not working so well, then it can't regulate blood pressure as well, but also it can work the other way that the high blood pressure Puts a lot of damage pushed a lot of stress on the kidney.

The friction actually hurts the kidney, so the kidney can cause and be the result of high blood pressure. Now anemia number three: how does that happen? Well, the kidney senses. How much oxygen is in your blood and if there's, not enough, it's, going to produce a hormone called epo or erythropoietin.

That means making red stuff basically and what it's making is red blood cells. So if you go up into the mountains for a few weeks, your kidney senses there's less oxygen, let's, make more red blood cells.

But if there's, damage to the kidney, then it can't keep up with making enough of this epo and you're, not making enough red blood cells, and you get anemic symptom number four that can happen in Stage three, as things get more serious is bone disease.

Normal bone looks like this. Osteoporotic bone looks like that, and this is because there's. A mineral called phosphate and phosphate needs to be balanced with calcium. The ratio is much more important than how much you actually have of each.

So if the kidney gets damaged now it can't, keep up with eliminating with getting rid of so as it loses the ability to clear the phosphate. The phosphate builds up in the blood, and now we have to balance it with calcium, so the body makes a hormone that is going to pull calcium from the bone to balance that phosphate, so that's.

How kidney disease can actually cause osteoporosis, but there's even more stuff going on in stage three. We can have edema and primarily in hands feet and in the face around the eyes, and this happens because, as the kidney starts getting really damaged and really leaky now the protein spills out of the kidney into the urine and one of those proteins is called albumin And it's, the number one blood protein and it acts like a sponge.

It has an osmotic pull that keeps the water in the appropriate amount inside the blood vessel. As we start dropping as we lose albumin, we also start losing water. It just leaks into the surrounding tissues, causing swelling called edema back pain is also very common, and there's two ways this can show up if it's more diffused.

If it's like all over and not in a non-general way in the back, then it's, usually a referred pain and any time an organ has a lot of distress. We can get some referred pain around that organ now, if this pain is more sharp, if it feels like someone stabbed you in the back and won't, let go that's, probably a kidney stone, and one way that you can Distinguish this from other severe back pain? Is that a kidney stone typically is not gonna ease up? No matter what you put your body position in it's like you, just can't get out of that pain, because the kidney stone is like a glass shard that's just sitting trying to make its way out Through a tiny tube and it doesn't matter, how you move your body, it's, just still gonna hurt stage, four of chronic kidney disease.

Now it's, getting really really serious. The filtration is close to shutting down 15 to 29 milliliters per minute. The symptoms are going to be the exact same ones as in stage three, but they're, going to happen more frequently to a greater percentage of people to a more severe degree, and so all the symptoms become more severe.

The damage to the kidney goes from moderate to severe, and now we're in a very, very serious state. We really want to catch it way way way before it ever gets to this, because it's rare that you can do anything about it at this point now you're, very near kidney failure and they typically they give you counseling To start preparing you for dialysis, or if you're fortunate to get a transplant, you really don't want to get to this point stage: 5 of chronic kidney disease.

Now we're, pretty close to complete failure. We're less than 15 milliliters per minute. If it hasn & # 39, t shut down completely it's really close, and now we're, going to start seeing some more extreme symptoms that you would never get in the earlier stages and breathing is going to suffer.

Why you're, almost drowning in your own lungs, because this fluid that's leaking out into the tissues from edema from a lack of albumin. Now it can start filling up your lungs known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

You also get things like sleeping trouble. You can't sleep through the night because your body gets so toxic. Your whole nervous system is basically on fire. You have ammonia breath. Ammonia is something you normally get rid of through the urine, but nothing's getting out that way, so the body is desperately trying to rid of it any way it can, such as through the lungs, and you also can find a metallic taste as More toxins to start building up trying to leave the body and overall, your toxicity levels, just keep increasing, keep increasing and you're, going to see things like itching like nausea and vomiting.

Like i said, the body should try and get rid of the toxins any way it can, and at this point obviously, you're, not going to have much appetite because the body doesn't want anything coming in it'S just trying to get rid of stuff very commonly you see things like muscle cramps, because your minerals, your electrolytes, are a mess because your kidneys can't regulate any of that anymore.

So at this point there's, not a whole lot. You can do it's really just a matter of time before there's, dialysis, kidney transplant or death. Now i think you agree that's, a pretty unpleasant picture that's, pretty dark! None of us would ever want to get to that point.

So here's, the big question: what does it look like before it ever gets to any of these stages? Would you agree that that is the time that you want to do something about it? So here is the early way that you can tell the earliest.

It can tell it's called insulin resistance, and if you watch some videos on this channel, you probably recognize that. But why is it related to the kidney because type 2 diabetes is the number one cause of kidney failure? And how does it do that? Because diabetes destroys tiny, delicate blood vessels and the kidney has lots of them another place they're common is in the retina, so diabetes is also the number one cause of blindness and it can also destroy fine nerve, endings and tiny blood vessels.

In the periphery of the body, so it's. Also the number one cause of amputations and the list goes on and on. But if you really want to take care of your kidneys, then start learning about insulin, resistance and reverse that if you enjoyed this video - and you'd like to learn more, that one would be a great one to watch next.

Thank you. So much for watching i'll, see you next time.


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