How To TRULY Lose Weight Forever! (Keto Diet vs Calorie Density Diet)

Hello, Health Champions. Today I want to talk about the calorie density diet, which is a low calorie diet and how it compares to a very high calorie density diet like the ketogenic diet. By the end of this video, you will understand how they really work and how to get the best long-term, sustainable results in terms of weight, loss and health.

Coming right up, hey, I'm, Dr Ekberg, I'm, a holistic doctor and a former Olympic decathlete, and if you want to truly master health by understanding how the body really works, make sure you subscribe and hit that notification bell.

So you don't miss anything. The whole premise of the low calorie density diet is that you can eat large amounts of food as long as they have few calories per pound, so something like non-starchy vegetables.

They would have 60 to 200 calories per pound, so even if you ate five pounds worth you still, wouldn't have more than a few hundred calories and the non-starchy vegetables would be the best and then followed by fruit, which has a little bit More calories, but still very few, so you could eat a lot of fruit as well.

Tubers, corn and rice have more calories, but they're still. Okay, they're still, mostly water and fiber beans and lentils follow and they're still good, so these would be the foods on the calorie density diet.

That is your foundation. You can have basically as much as you want of those and then when they have more calories like meat, fish and eggs. Now you need to limit them. You can't have as much you should avoid them or eat them sparingly.

Things like bread and muffins have even more calories, so stay away from those sugar, honey and agave. Everyone agrees, but they have more calories. So here you need to stay away from those dry. Cereal and crackers have even more so limit those cheese and cream is a no-no.

1600 to 1800 calories. Nuts and seeds have astronomical amounts of calories almost as much as butter and oil, which tops the scale over 3 000 up to 4 000 calories per pound. The whole premise again is that if you want to eat large amounts of food, you can feel full all the time by eating pounds and pounds worth of non-caloric low caloric foods, and that way you stay full.

But you're, not getting very many calories. I want to cover a few issues, and the first one is that this model is stuck in the idea that calories are evil. A lot of calories is a bad thing. A few calories is a good thing.

Well, every other species on the planet tries to get as many calories as possible to survive and as long as they eat food that's appropriate for their species, they can trust their hunger and satiety responses.

Well, humans have stopped eating food that's, appropriate for our species. We have started eating grain and sugar and processed foods, and chemicals and artificial flavorings, and all of these different things that hijack our hormone system and they hijack our hunger and satiety responses.

So we can & # 39, t trust our hunger and satiety anymore and as a result we have become obese and for some reason the simplest thing seemed to be to blame it all on calories. Well, it's, not quite that simple and now the other next issue i have with this model is that it's, not very satisfying that sure you can eat five pounds of lettuce and not get a whole lot of calories, but You do a whole lot of chewing and you won't, be very satisfied and if you're, not satisfied, then it's.

Not sustainable life has to have some satisfaction. We need to feel satisfied. We need to feel full. We need to feel good, and if the food doesn't do that it's, not sustainable. How long will you stay full? Even if you can stuff yourself, you can fill the volume of your stomach with these foods.

How long will you stay full? Are you going to have to top it off? Are you going to pretty much have to eat all day long and the next issue they ignore is hormones that hormones determine human behavior.

You can fight it. You can have willpower that will get you so far for a short time, but in the long run your hormones will be determine your behavior hormones like leptin, ghrelin and insulin. Leptin is a tidy hormone.

Ghrelin's. A hunger hormone and insulin is your main metabolic hormone and that's. The one we're going to talk about the most here insulin is not a bad thing. It's, not your enemy. It is a wonderful, healthy hormone as long as we maintain it in balance.

So if we have a feast, if we eat a lot of food, then insulin increases and it helps us store that extra food, the excess from that feast. We store it as fat. So then, when there is famine, when there's a time of less food, now that insulin goes down and allows us to use the fat until we can have another feast.

So as long as it's in balance, it's, a wonderful and healthy and necessary thing. Now here's. What we want to focus on and understand, insulin is a fat storing hormone. It doesn't directly work on fat, but it works on glucose and the glucose gets shunted into the cells and the excess glucose gets converted to fat.

So, indirectly, insulin is a fat storing hormone, it promotes lipogenesis, and this is a good thing for a famine. Now it also decreases fat burning because you don't want to burn fat. While you're in the process of storing it and let's, take a look now at once.

We understand that insulin is the key to this. It's, not the calories. It's, the insulin, then, how do we reduce it? Well, one way is with carbs low carb, high fat diet and the second is intermittent fasting to eat less often because every time you eat, you signal the body to make insulin and store fat.

The third way is to reduce the quantity, so this is how the low calorie diets work, but they don't work very long. So let's. Take a look at how that works. Now, if you're insulin resistant, that means that even when you don't eat, your insulin remains high.

So if you have a blood test, a fasting insulin test, a good value would be between three and five. But if your value is five six seven times higher than that, that means you have a high insulin level, even when you don't eat.

So here's. What happens you eat less, but that high insulin level prevents your body from burning fat and because of these two principles, your fat stores are not available. Normally, when you don & # 39, t eat your body's supposed to access that fat.

That extra energy, but with high insulin the body can't see it and two things happen now when the stores are unavailable. Now you get hungry because you stopped eating, but you can't get to the stores see normally, when insulin is in balance, when you don & # 39, t eat insulin goes down, but when you & # 39, re insulin resistant that doesn't happen so now, when you cut back on the calories, you just get more hungry.

The other thing that happens when your fat stores are unavailable because of high insulin is that your body has a perception of lack, even though you may have hundreds of thousands of calories stored up from previous feasts.

When your insulin is high, your body can't see them, so the overall impression is there is still lack, and if there is lack, then we better save let's turn down the basal metabolic rate. So now your metabolism slows down, and these two things put together makes it impossible for you to keep eating less in the long run.

Like i said, willpower will take you so far. You can do it for a few weeks or even a few months, but eventually you will go back to eating more and now you're stuck in a cycle, so the key is to reduce the insulin and now that we understand that, let's, see how these color categories, how this going from good to worst? How that correlates with insulin, so the leafy greens, the non-starchy vegetables, they're still great.

However, the fruit is not great anymore, even though it's low. In calories the sugar in it is going to increase insulin and the fructose is going to start, clogging the liver, and we'll, get more into those in a little bit.

The tubers, corn and rice is even worse because they are only minutes away from turning into sugar. They're very starchy, and the body starts breaking them down as soon as you put them in the mouth, so they raise blood sugar and they're bad for insulin, beans and lentils, even though they are higher in calories are not As bad for blood sugar, because they're not absorbed as quickly meat, fish and eggs are higher in calories, but very low insulin response.

The protein in meat can eventually turn into glucose, so it does have some insulin response, but it's much better than any of those. Three bread muffins is terrible turns into glucose very quickly, sugar, honey and agave.

Some of this, like agave, could actually be good because the more fructose it has the less the blood sugar responds, but as we'll see in a minute the worse, it is for your overall insulin resistance, so they're, going from Good to bad dry, cereal and crackers go from bad to worst, depending on how processed they are.

Cheese. Cream are great. Nuts and seeds go from good to great, depending on how much fat and how much carbs are in there. Butter and oil is great. So, as you can see, there is not a whole lot of agreement in the colors between the calorie scale and the insulin scale, and i want to make the argument that the insulin scale is much more important.

So you want to focus on the foods that are good or great in terms of insulin, because that's, how you reverse the insulin resistance? Now let's. Talk about the other aspect of insulin, resistance, which is the liver.

If you are insulin resistant, then you are very very likely. You're, almost guaranteed to have a fatty liver to some degree, and this is called if you don't drink alcohol, it's called non-alcoholic fatty, liver disease, and this pretty much all comes down to fructose.

Fructose is about as bad as alcohol in terms of clogging up and stressing the liver. The two factors that stress the liver is fructose and insulin, and we already talked about the insulin. So now we want to keep that in the back of our minds, but we want to focus on how much fructose do these things have so in terms of liver, clogging potential, the non-starchy vegetables are still great.

The fruit, however, goes from okay to bad, depending on how much sugar and how much fructose is in there. Tubers, corn and rice is higher in starch. It affects blood sugar more, but it has less sugar and fructose than fruit.

So, even though it's higher in calories, it's, actually a little better for the liver beans and lentils are also okay. Meat, fish and eggs are even better because there is no sugar. There is nothing to clog up the liver and the blood sugar response is very, very moderate.

Bread and muffins go from okay to worst. If it's pure starch, it's, okay, the more sugar they add. It goes all the way to worst all concentrated, refined. Sugars are terrible, absolute worst dry cereal same as the muffins.

If they're pure starch, then they're okay from a fructose perspective. But if you add some sweetener, then they're. The worst cheese and cream are good because there's, very low blood sugar impact, and there is no fructose nuts and seeds are good, and butter and oil are the best.

They have virtually zero insulin response and they contain no fructose. As you can see, there's again, very little correlation between the calorie scale and the liver, clogging aspects, and this is going to be similar to the insulin.

But if you go back and review, you & # 39. Ll see that there are some differences and the main thing is going to depend on how much sugar they contain, and the next variable i want to look at is satiety, because this is also huge.

How satisfied how full do you get? How long can you go till the next meal, and are you going to feel good enough eating this food that you want to stick with it now, starchy non-starchy vegetables were really great all the way, but here's, the problem they don't contain hardly anything of anything so satiety-wise they're, the worst.

You cannot sustain yourself on eating those alone fruit, same thing. They satisfy you for a very short while, but after a few minutes to an hour or two now you have to eat again: tubers, corn and rice.

They're a little bit better. They're. Okay, beans and lentils are even better because they contain some protein that they're a little bit more satisfying meat, fish and eggs are the best these animal proteins.

They are very, very satisfying. They're, very complete foods, and if you try to do something like one meal a day protocol, then you & # 39. Ll find that these foods are the easiest to use to stick to that one meal a day, because you get so satisfying it's, easy to just eat once a day.

Bread muffins are okay, too bad, depending on how much fat is in them. Sugar, honey and agave are bad dry. Cereal crackers are okay, cheese and cream. Great nuts and seeds are great butter, and oil are great.

So, as you can see here, with the exception of sugar, which is just terrible in so many ways because it's, processed just doesn't satisfy us, you & # 39, ll, see that pretty much the scale is turned upside down And that's, why it's, so difficult to lose weight by counting calories, because it is not very satisfying.

So the calorie density diet is really just another form of calorie counting you, don't have to count calories per say if you just know which foods to focus on. But the whole premise is that you need to eat less calories and how has the success rate been? How has this been working? I think that's, the biggest question we need to ask for the last 50 to 70 years, when the standard model has been go on a diet eat less food eat fewer calories.

How successful has that been? Well, the failure rate has been somewhere around 98, so i would call that an abysmal failure or a monumental failure, or if you prefer, a spectacular failure. I mean just look at the track record all right now, calorie density diets.

They do promote whole foods, which is a big step in the right direction, but you still have to eat satisfying food. If you want it to last, and we have to start understanding that it's, the hormones that determine your behavior, you can fight it.

You can have some willpower, you can create some temporary change, but in the long run you have to balance your hormones or it will not be sustainable. It will not be successful long term if you enjoyed this video and you'd like to learn more about how to get truly healthy.

I think you should really check that one out next. Thank you. So much for watching i & # 39. Ll see you in the next video feet mission, hello, health champions. Today i want to talk about the calorie density diet, which is a low calorie diet and how it compares to a very high calorie density diet like the ketogenic diet.

By the end of this video, you will understand how they really work and how to get the best long-term, sustainable results in terms of weight, loss and health. Coming right up, hey, i'm, dr ekberg, i'm, a holistic doctor and a former olympic decathlete, and if you want to truly master health by understanding how the body really works, make sure you subscribe and hit that notification bell.

So you don't miss anything. The whole premise of the low calorie density diet is that you can eat large amounts of food as long as they have few calories per pound, so something like non-starchy vegetables.

They would have 60 to 200 calories per pound, so even if you ate five pounds worth you still, wouldn't have more than a few hundred calories and the non-starchy vegetables would be the best and then followed by fruit, which has a little bit More calories, but still very few, so you could eat a lot of fruit as well.

Tubers, corn and rice have more calories, but they're still. Okay, they're still, mostly water and fiber beans and lentils follow and they're still good, so these would be the foods on the calorie density diet.

That is your foundation. You can have basically as much as you want of those and then when they have more calories like meat, fish and eggs. Now you need to limit them. You can't have as much you should avoid them or eat them sparingly.

Things like bread and muffins have even more calories, so stay away from those sugar, honey and agave. Everyone agrees, but they have more calories. So here you need to stay away from those dry. Cereal and crackers have even more so limit those cheese and cream is a no-no.

1600 to 1800 calories. Nuts and seeds have astronomical amounts of calories almost as much as butter and oil, which tops the scale over 3 000 up to 4 000 calories per pound. The whole premise again is that if you want to eat large amounts of food, you can feel full all the time by eating pounds and pounds worth of non-caloric low caloric foods, and that way you stay full.

But you're, not getting very many calories. I want to cover a few issues, and the first one is that this model is stuck in the idea that calories are evil. A lot of calories is a bad thing. A few calories is a good thing.

Well, every other species on the planet tries to get as many calories as possible to survive and as long as they eat food that's appropriate for their species, they can trust their hunger and satiety responses.

Well, humans have stopped eating food that's, appropriate for our species. We have started eating grain and sugar and processed foods, and chemicals and artificial flavorings, and all of these different things that hijack our hormone system and they hijack our hunger and satiety responses.

So we can & # 39, t trust our hunger and satiety anymore and as a result we have become obese and for some reason the simplest thing seemed to be to blame it all on calories. Well, it's, not quite that simple and now the other next issue i have with this model is that it's, not very satisfying that sure you can eat five pounds of lettuce and not get a whole lot of calories, but You do a whole lot of chewing and you won't, be very satisfied and if you're, not satisfied, then it's.

Not sustainable life has to have some satisfaction. We need to feel satisfied. We need to feel full. We need to feel good, and if the food doesn't do that it's, not sustainable. How long will you stay full? Even if you can stuff yourself, you can fill the volume of your stomach with these foods.

How long will you stay full? Are you going to have to top it off? Are you going to pretty much have to eat all day long and the next issue they ignore is hormones that hormones determine human behavior.

You can fight it. You can have willpower that will get you so far for a short time, but in the long run your hormones will be determine your behavior hormones like leptin, ghrelin and insulin. Leptin is a tidy hormone.

Ghrelin's. A hunger hormone and insulin is your main metabolic hormone and that's. The one we're going to talk about the most here insulin is not a bad thing. It's, not your enemy. It is a wonderful, healthy hormone as long as we maintain it in balance.

So if we have a feast, if we eat a lot of food, then insulin increases and it helps us store that extra food, the excess from that feast. We store it as fat. So then, when there is famine, when there's a time of less food, now that insulin goes down and allows us to use the fat until we can have another feast.

So as long as it's in balance, it's, a wonderful and healthy and necessary thing. Now here's. What we want to focus on and understand, insulin is a fat storing hormone. It doesn't directly work on fat, but it works on glucose and the glucose gets shunted into the cells and the excess glucose gets converted to fat.

So, indirectly, insulin is a fat storing hormone, it promotes lipogenesis, and this is a good thing for a famine. Now it also decreases fat burning because you don't want to burn fat. While you're in the process of storing it and let's, take a look now at once.

We understand that insulin is the key to this. It's, not the calories. It's, the insulin, then, how do we reduce it? Well, one way is with carbs low carb, high fat diet and the second is intermittent fasting to eat less often because every time you eat, you signal the body to make insulin and store fat.

The third way is to reduce the quantity, so this is how the low calorie diets work, but they don't work very long. So let's. Take a look at how that works. Now, if you're insulin resistant, that means that even when you don't eat, your insulin remains high.

So if you have a blood test, a fasting insulin test, a good value would be between three and five. But if your value is five six seven times higher than that, that means you have a high insulin level, even when you don't eat.

So here's. What happens you eat less, but that high insulin level prevents your body from burning fat and because of these two principles, your fat stores are not available. Normally, when you don & # 39, t eat your body's supposed to access that fat.

That extra energy, but with high insulin the body can't see it and two things happen now when the stores are unavailable. Now you get hungry because you stopped eating, but you can't get to the stores see normally, when insulin is in balance, when you don & # 39, t eat insulin goes down, but when you & # 39, re insulin resistant that doesn't happen so now, when you cut back on the calories, you just get more hungry.

The other thing that happens when your fat stores are unavailable because of high insulin is that your body has a perception of lack, even though you may have hundreds of thousands of calories stored up from previous feasts.

When your insulin is high, your body can't see them, so the overall impression is there is still lack, and if there is lack, then we better save let's turn down the basal metabolic rate. So now your metabolism slows down, and these two things put together makes it impossible for you to keep eating less in the long run.

Like i said, willpower will take you so far. You can do it for a few weeks or even a few months, but eventually you will go back to eating more and now you're stuck in a cycle, so the key is to reduce the insulin and now that we understand that, let's, see how these color categories, how this going from good to worst? How that correlates with insulin, so the leafy greens, the non-starchy vegetables, they're still great.

However, the fruit is not great anymore, even though it's low. In calories the sugar in it is going to increase insulin and the fructose is going to start, clogging the liver, and we'll, get more into those in a little bit.

The tubers, corn and rice is even worse because they are only minutes away from turning into sugar. They're very starchy, and the body starts breaking them down as soon as you put them in the mouth, so they raise blood sugar and they're bad for insulin, beans and lentils, even though they are higher in calories are not As bad for blood sugar, because they're not absorbed as quickly meat, fish and eggs are higher in calories, but very low insulin response.

The protein in meat can eventually turn into glucose, so it does have some insulin response, but it's much better than any of those. Three bread muffins is terrible turns into glucose very quickly, sugar, honey and agave.

Some of this, like agave, could actually be good because the more fructose it has the less the blood sugar responds, but as we'll see in a minute the worse, it is for your overall insulin resistance, so they're, going from Good to bad dry, cereal and crackers go from bad to worst, depending on how processed they are.

Cheese. Cream are great. Nuts and seeds go from good to great, depending on how much fat and how much carbs are in there. Butter and oil is great. So, as you can see, there is not a whole lot of agreement in the colors between the calorie scale and the insulin scale, and i want to make the argument that the insulin scale is much more important.

So you want to focus on the foods that are good or great in terms of insulin, because that's, how you reverse the insulin resistance? Now let's. Talk about the other aspect of insulin, resistance, which is the liver.

If you are insulin resistant, then you are very very likely. You're, almost guaranteed to have a fatty liver to some degree, and this is called if you don't drink alcohol, it's called non-alcoholic fatty, liver disease, and this pretty much all comes down to fructose.

Fructose is about as bad as alcohol in terms of clogging up and stressing the liver. The two factors that stress the liver is fructose and insulin, and we already talked about the insulin. So now we want to keep that in the back of our minds, but we want to focus on how much fructose do these things have so in terms of liver, clogging potential, the non-starchy vegetables are still great.

The fruit, however, goes from okay to bad, depending on how much sugar and how much fructose is in there. Tubers, corn and rice is higher in starch. It affects blood sugar more, but it has less sugar and fructose than fruit.

So, even though it's higher in calories, it's, actually a little better for the liver beans and lentils are also okay. Meat, fish and eggs are even better because there is no sugar. There is nothing to clog up the liver and the blood sugar response is very, very moderate.

Bread and muffins go from okay to worst. If it's pure starch, it's, okay, the more sugar they add. It goes all the way to worst all concentrated, refined. Sugars are terrible, absolute worst dry cereal same as the muffins.

If they're pure starch, then they're okay from a fructose perspective. But if you add some sweetener, then they're. The worst cheese and cream are good because there's, very low blood sugar impact, and there is no fructose nuts and seeds are good, and butter and oil are the best.

They have virtually zero insulin response and they contain no fructose. As you can see, there's again, very little correlation between the calorie scale and the liver, clogging aspects, and this is going to be similar to the insulin.

But if you go back and review, you & # 39. Ll see that there are some differences and the main thing is going to depend on how much sugar they contain, and the next variable i want to look at is satiety, because this is also huge.

How satisfied how full do you get? How long can you go till the next meal, and are you going to feel good enough eating this food that you want to stick with it now, starchy non-starchy vegetables were really great all the way, but here's, the problem they don't contain hardly anything of anything so satiety-wise they're, the worst.

You cannot sustain yourself on eating those alone fruit, same thing. They satisfy you for a very short while, but after a few minutes to an hour or two now you have to eat again: tubers, corn and rice.

They're a little bit better. They're. Okay, beans and lentils are even better because they contain some protein that they're a little bit more satisfying meat, fish and eggs are the best these animal proteins.

They are very, very satisfying. They're, very complete foods, and if you try to do something like one meal a day protocol, then you & # 39. Ll find that these foods are the easiest to use to stick to that one meal a day, because you get so satisfying it's, easy to just eat once a day.

Bread muffins are okay, too bad, depending on how much fat is in them. Sugar, honey and agave are bad dry. Cereal crackers are okay, cheese and cream. Great nuts and seeds are great butter, and oil are great.

So, as you can see here, with the exception of sugar, which is just terrible in so many ways because it's, processed just doesn't satisfy us, you & # 39, ll, see that pretty much the scale is turned upside down And that's, why it's, so difficult to lose weight by counting calories, because it is not very satisfying.

So the calorie density diet is really just another form of calorie counting you, don't have to count calories per say if you just know which foods to focus on. But the whole premise is that you need to eat less calories and how has the success rate been? How has this been working? I think that's, the biggest question we need to ask for the last 50 to 70 years, when the standard model has been go on a diet eat less food eat fewer calories.

How successful has that been? Well, the failure rate has been somewhere around 98, so i would call that an abysmal failure or a monumental failure, or if you prefer, a spectacular failure. I mean just look at the track record all right now, calorie density diets.

They do promote whole foods, which is a big step in the right direction, but you still have to eat satisfying food. If you want it to last, and we have to start understanding that it's, the hormones that determine your behavior, you can fight it.

You can have some willpower, you can create some temporary change, but in the long run you have to balance your hormones or it will not be sustainable. It will not be successful long term if you enjoyed this video and you'd like to learn more about how to get truly healthy.

I think you should really check that one out next. Thank you. So much for watching i & # 39. Ll see you in the next video feet mission:


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